We have Justice in Common

In October 2007, an “Open Letter” was sent from Muslim religious leaders to Christian leaders inviting them to come to “A Common Word” between them about the primacy of loving God and loving one’s neighbour. The document was originally signed by 138 Muslim leaders from various countries but South and South-East Asia and Africa in general were under-represented, especially when it is considered that these are the areas of the world in which Muslims and Christians live in large number and engage in daily contact. In the light of this, the Konrad Adenauer Stiftung in Germany in October 2009 convened a colloquium of Christian and Muslim scholars and activists from these two regions to discuss the Open Letter and its impact on their local communities. The resulting report, edited by Christian Troll, Helmut Reifeld and Chris Hewer, called We have Justice in Common, was published in 2010. The name was chosen to reflect the overwhelming sense of the colloquium that the central ethical principle of justice needed to be added to any discussion of Christian-Muslim relations. The full text of the report is available to download here.
We have Justice in Common

A Journey into Understanding Islam

For much of the last dozen years, I have been running courses, writing and
talking to people to help them to understand Islam and Christian-Muslim
relations. For six years in Birmingham (1999-2005), when I was the Adviser
on Inter-Faith Relations to the Bishop of Birmingham, my focus widened to
include practical and structural relations between all the major faiths in that
great cosmopolitan city. For the last five years (2006-2010), I worked in
London with a narrower focus – precisely to develop adult popular education in
understanding Islam for Christians and others, understanding Christianity for
Muslims, Christian-Muslim relations in history and today, and exploring the
multi-faceted world of Muslims and the West. This work was generously
funded by a syndicate of four charitable bodies, both Muslim and Christian, of
which the St Ethelburga Centre for Reconciliation and Peace was one, and so I
was known as the St Ethelburga Fellow in Christian-Muslim Relations. But the
story does not begin there!

Click here to read the full article “Journey into Understanding